Let’s Go For a Nature Hike

Ready for a hike? What should we take with us?

  • Comfortable shoes and loose-fitting clothes suitable for the weather.
  • Field guides to help us identify any new species of plants and animals.
  • A small notebook and pencil for sketching things so they can be identified after returning home, and for noting new species and observations.
  • A collecting sack, if going for leaves, mosses, edible mushrooms, etc.
  • Binoculars, if watching for birds or mammals.
  • A compass and trail map, if necessary.
  • A canteen of water, and some lightweight, high-energy food, if a long hike.
  • A first aid kit and/or snake bite kit, if necessary.
  • Family and/or friends. Always let someone know where you are going and when you expect to return.

A Month-By-Month Bird Calendar

Times will vary from one part of the country to another, depending on latitude, weather patterns, and other factors.

January — Build or order bluebird houses. Feed ducks or geese that winter locally. Great horned owls on nests.

February — Set up bluebird houses. Read some good books. May see early robins by end of month.

March — All bird boxes should be set up. Watch for red-winged blackbirds.

April — May hear woodcocks in evening. Look for early robin nests in evergreens, before other trees have leaves. Bluebirds will be building nests and incubating.

May — Later migrants arrive—thrashers, orioles, thrushes. Nature hike for migrating spring warblers. Experiment with Audubon bird call. Hang hummingbird feeders.

June — Good time for nature hikes in natural woods—weeds not yet out-of-control. Robins may be on second brood, orioles nesting. Vacationing? Take binoculars, field guides, and list new species seen on trip.

July — Birds active at sun-up. Summer evenings, look for nighthawks catching insects above shopping center lights. At dusk, throw a stone in a handkerchief up to watch a swooping bat.

August — Supply birds with water for a splash on hot days.

September — Set up new feeders to accustom birds to them.

October — Early, put seed in established winter feeders. Watch and listen for migrating geese, cranes, other fowl.

November — Study bird books and calls. Sketch birds at feeder. Keep a list of birds sighted when any new species appear.

December — On poster board, make a large record for listing all birds seen next year, starting January 1st. Draw and color some birds in its margins, and hang near feeder window.

Visit Our Store In Danville, Indiana

Store location:

Nature’s Workshop Plus!
3055 E Main Street
Danville, Indiana 46122

Call toll free:

(888) 393-5663

Regular store hours:

Mon: 8:00 am-6:00 pm
Tues-Fri: 8:00 am-5:00 pm
1st Sat of Month: 9:00 am-12:00 pm
Closed Sunday

Holiday hours:

As above except as noted below.
Closed December 24-25
Closed December 31, Janurary 1

Email us:

mail@workshopplus.com

Store Image

Store information:

Current time for Shipping orders: 1-2 workdays.

Call in your order and pick-up in Danville to save on shipping.

If you are passing by, stop in to see us and check out our in store specials.

Map

Let’s Go For a Nature Hike

Ready for a hike? What should we take with us?

  • Comfortable shoes and loose-fitting clothes suitable for the weather.
  • Field guides to help us identify any new species of plants and animals.
  • A small notebook and pencil for sketching things so they can be identified after returning home, and for noting new species and observations.
  • A collecting sack, if going for leaves, mosses, edible mushrooms, etc.
  • Binoculars, if watching for birds or mammals.
  • A compass and trail map, if necessary.
  • A canteen of water, and some lightweight, high-energy food, if a long hike.
  • A first aid kit and/or snake bite kit, if necessary.
  • Family and/or friends. Always let someone know where you are going and when you expect to return.

A Month-By-Month Bird Calendar

Times will vary from one part of the country to another, depending on latitude, weather patterns, and other factors.

January — Build or order bluebird houses. Feed ducks or geese that winter locally. Great horned owls on nests.

February — Set up bluebird houses. Read some good books. May see early robins by end of month.

March — All bird boxes should be set up. Watch for red-winged blackbirds.

April — May hear woodcocks in evening. Look for early robin nests in evergreens, before other trees have leaves. Bluebirds will be building nests and incubating.

May — Later migrants arrive—thrashers, orioles, thrushes. Nature hike for migrating spring warblers. Experiment with Audubon bird call. Hang hummingbird feeders.

June — Good time for nature hikes in natural woods—weeds not yet out-of-control. Robins may be on second brood, orioles nesting. Vacationing? Take binoculars, field guides, and list new species seen on trip.

July — Birds active at sun-up. Summer evenings, look for nighthawks catching insects above shopping center lights. At dusk, throw a stone in a handkerchief up to watch a swooping bat.

August — Supply birds with water for a splash on hot days.

September — Set up new feeders to accustom birds to them.

October — Early, put seed in established winter feeders. Watch and listen for migrating geese, cranes, other fowl.

November — Study bird books and calls. Sketch birds at feeder. Keep a list of birds sighted when any new species appear.

December — On poster board, make a large record for listing all birds seen next year, starting January 1st. Draw and color some birds in its margins, and hang near feeder window.

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